Monthly Archives: August 2010

RClimate Tools for Do It Yourself Climate Trend Analysis

In this post I introduce my RClimate functions which allow R users to easily download and plot monthly temperature anomaly data for the 5 major global temperature anomaly data series: GISS, HAD, NOAA, RSS, UAH.

Consolidated LOTA Data File

In this previous post I introduced my global  Land Ocean Temperature Anomaly (LOTA) monthly csv file that Excel and R users can download to conduct climate trend analysis.

In this post, I introduce my RClimate.txt R scripts that users can source() to simplify access to the LOTA data.  Please note that I have used the “.txt” descriptor  for my file type to avoid download problems encountered when I use the standard R file descriptor.

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Enhanced UAH Channel 5 Temperature Anomaly Trend Chart: Update 1

This post discusses my updated and enhanced UAH Channel 5 daily trend chart. Updated 3/29/11

Update 1: 3/29/11

Since I have received a number of comments and questions about this post, I am updating it to address these comments and improve the chart.

I plot the Channel 5 data because it is available in rear real time so that readers can get a sense for how the monthly global temperature anomaly is shaping up. However, the comments tell me that there is some confusion about Channel 5 and how it compares to the UAH TLT data.

Lucia at The Blackboard has a detailed discussion of UAH TLT and Channel 5 here. Bob Illis has an interesting chart that shows the differences between UAH TLT and Channel 5 here.

Dr. Roy Spencer discussed tracking daily global temperature anomalies here.

I have revised my chart to show both the UAH TLT 5.4 and Channel 5 monthly trends as well as the daily Channel 5 data for the current month.

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Original Post

I’ve added this UAH Channel 5 trend chart to my sidebar:  (Click to enlarge)

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Do It Yourself Climate Trend Analysis

This post describes my consolidated global temperature anomaly CSV file that users can easily download to Excel or R to do their own trend analysis.

Do It Yourself Global Temperature Anomaly  Trend Analysis

As I wrote in my July 10, 2009 post,

“There are many blogs and web sites (small sample: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) with multiple opinions on global climate trends. Some sites are data oriented and others are opinion oriented. What is a [data analyst] charter to think?

My advice, take a look at the data for yourself. As an Excel or R charter, why not analyze it yourself to get a better appreciation for what is going on.

To help you get started, I’ve developed a consolidated monthly CSV file that presents  the 5 major global land and ocean temperature anomaly data series: GISS, NOAA, HADCrut3, RSS and UAH.

Here’s the link to my consolidated temperature anomaly CSV file.

I update the consolidated file regularly by downloading the latest agency source files so that the consolidated file includes all source agency data revisions. This way you can get the most up-to-date temperature anomaly data without having to reformat/ manipulate the 5 individual files.